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Latest press releases and articles

12 Incredible Hotels for Art Lovers in India - Huffington Post SwaSwara ˗ May 12, 2016 SwaSwara- 12/12/2017

Aside from the usual offerings (yoga, Ayurveda) that are available for soul-searching travellers, SwaSwara also places a heavy emphasis on art therapy. “The beauty of art is that there is no rigid definition of everything in life, and teaches tolerance and with unencumbered acceptance,” says Mini Chandran, general manager. “It encourages people to think and look out of the mental boxes most of us have unconsciously interred ourselves in, and frees the inner child hidden within.” Click here

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Falling in love with the ancient arts at SwaSwara ˗ Queen of Retreats SwaSwara SwaSwara- 12/12/2017

I went to SwaSwara, which spills down green hills to a sacred Om-shaped beach, to recover from an intense project. I wanted yoga and ayurvedic massage, and the highest quality and luxury, but not some bland, international or expat version of these ancient arts. Click here

Footfall Without Footprints ˗ The Hindu SwaSwara ˗ March 17, 2013 SwaSwara- 12/12/2017

Tourism has received adverse criticism due to its perceived threat to the environment as it makes inroads into ecologically sensitive regions and biodiversity hotspots. This derives mainly from the perception that tourism, be it high-end luxury hotels or low-end mass tourism, can blight landscapes by leaving its undesirable footprints by consuming local resources and generating undesirable waste. Sustained accumulation of such footprints alongside unplanned and unregulated development far exceeds the carrying capacity of the locality. SwaSwara , meaning inner voice, is a unique experiment where tourists literally do not leave any footprints behind. Surrounded by dense forests, the 26.5 acre property is located on the famous ‘Om’ beach at Gokarna, some 180 km south of Goa. Click here

Next time I’ll see the real India ˗ Passage to India P2 ˗ Some Good Life SwaSwara ˗ November 9, 2011 SwaSwara- 12/12/2017

Phase two of my Indian holiday, an eco-retreat. Arguably a few days in Mumbai plus a spa week don’t count as the real India. Perhaps I only glimpsed the country as a passenger peering out car windows on purposeful journeys first through multi-national, western-ish Mumbai then the remote rural villages and semi-towns in the south. Every so often I did pause to soak up local culture ˗ shopping at a roadside vegetable market, learning to eat biryani (rice dish) with yogurt served on a coconut leaf with my hands, praying at a Shiva temple in the seaside village of Gokarna, watching ritual chanting at a Brahmin house, snacking on two plump veggie samosas and a masala dosa (savoury pancake) from Udupi Café for Rs 50.00 or roughly .64 pence ˗ the real, incredible India. My next trip I’ll discover more authentic-traditional-modern-day India, but for now on to SwaSwara. Click here

Holidays with Soul: Indian Wellness Getaways for Every Budget ˗ National Geographic Traveller India SwaSwara ˗ September 6, 2016 SwaSwara- 12/12/2017

Named from the Sanskrit words for “self” and “sound”, SwaSwara aims for guests to tune in to their inner voice—firstly, by providing a 26-acre property where all one hears is the hush of the ocean. Guests begin their day at the Ayurvedic wellness retreat with sunrise yoga classes, and follow up with massages as part of the treatment prescribed by an Ayurvedic doctor. Hit deep, relaxing states of mind with meditation sessions and walks on nearby Om beach, or find your zen with pottery and art classes. SwaSwara also arranges hiking, boating, and kayaking excursions. Catch sunset views of the ocean from the yoga deck atop each of the 24 villas, made of local laterite stone and thatch. The focus on “local” translates into meals comprised of freshly caught seafood, and vegetables and fruits from the organic garden. And if it all seems a bit too clean, the resort serves Indian wines. Click here

Responsible Tourism: An Effort By CGH Earth Group ˗ Outlook Traveller SwaSwara ˗ November 3, 2015 SwaSwara- 12/12/2017

He carried his resignation letter in his pocket for a month, a bright young Bombay-based CA with a promising career in a big -ticket firm, and newly married too. He really didn’t want to give it all up for his family’s hotel business in ol’ Cochin. But persistent letters and trunk calls from his ailing father finally persuaded him to hand in the notice. Only for two years, the oldest of six sons told himself, till at least a couple of his brothers finished their studies, and off he would go. “That was in 1978,” recalls Jose Dominic, now the 65-year-old patriarch of the CGH Earth Group. “I got sucked in and never left. Tourism was only beginning to gain relevance back then. It was among the most heavily taxed sectors, in fact. It was very different from what we see today.” Click here